URLs as a measure of user experience

I’m spending part of my morning looking through tech specs on various desktops and laptops for use as exemplars for our new building. Finding, deciding, and then sending links to our architects  for the systems I’m interested in, so that they can track down heat loads and such for HVAC calculations.

Tell me…which of the following URLs shows a company that cares about User Experience:

Dell Studio One
http://www.dell.com/us/en/home/desktops/desktop-studio-one-19/pd.aspx?refid=desktop-studio-one-19&s=dhs&cs=19&~oid=us~en~29~desktop-studio-one-19_anav_1~~

Lenovo C Series
http://shop.lenovo.com/SEUILibrary/controller/e/web/LenovoPortal/en_US/catalog.workflow:category.details?current-catalog-id=12F0696583E04D86B9B79B0FEC01C087&current-category-id=00C718E6D6AB498383A1A2F8DFF428C3

Apple iMac

http://www.apple.com/imac/

2 thoughts on “URLs as a measure of user experience

  1. You'll hear many people say that average people don't care about the format or structure URLs, that they barely even understand the concept, which I believe holds true when they're in the browser, but that assumption completely breaks down when they leave the browser and try to send a URL to someone via email or another method. Lenovo makes great computers but crappy websites.

  2. You'll hear many people say that average people don't care about the format or structure URLs, that they barely even understand the concept, which I believe holds true when they're in the browser, but that assumption completely breaks down when they leave the browser and try to send a URL to someone via email or another method. Lenovo makes great computers but crappy websites.

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