Amazon’s cheaper Echo Dot


If you’ve been looking for a way to test Amazon’s voice assistant/AI/Machine Learning gizmo Alexa, here’s the cheapest way yet to give it a try.

Amazon is unveiling an all-new, second-generation Dot today that’s priced at just $49.99. Just like the previous Dot, you can use the tiny puck-like device to add the Alexa voice assistant to existing speakers. Amazon is releasing the new Echo Dot in both black and white, with a more powerful, completely redesigned voice processor.

Source: Amazon’s cheaper Echo Dot improves voice recognition, available in black and white – The Verge

MYO – The Gesture Control Armband

This looks….promising. I don’t expect any single type of input mechanism to “win” in the alternative-input-wars, as some combination device/system is more likely to be more effective. But this looks very interesting…

The MYO armband lets you use the electrical activity in your muscles to wirelessly control your computer, phone, and other favorite digital technologies.

MYO – The Gesture Control Armband.

How to solve impossible problems: Daniel Russell’s awesome Google search techniques

Hey librarians: You think you’re good at finding things? Try this test on for size:

Daniel Russell stood in front of a crowd of investigative journalists in Boston last week and showed us this picture of a random skyscraper in an unknown city:

How to solve impossible problems

Russell posed a riddle:What’s the phone number of the office where this picture was snapped?

via How to solve impossible problems: Daniel Russell’s awesome Google search techniques.

Introducing the Leap

I’ve been talking for awhile now in my presentations and writing about how interfaces are changing, and how the way we design for information retrieval is going to evolve over the next few years as they do. Here’s a prime example of the sort of thing that will be trivial to do in a very short amount of time…gestures as UI for computing.

Introducing the Leap.