Google Wave and Igor

For the BIGWIG Showcase this year, I talked about and put together a presentation on Google Wave, and what I think it will do to library services. One of the things I talked about was the ability for software robots to watch the Wave, and alter it in specific ways. Well, it looks like we’ve got our first bibliographic example of this, with Igor. Stew over at Flags & Lollipops has put together a robot that will watch a given Wave for mentions of citations, and then query and automagically fill in footnotes from PubMed, Connotea, or CiteULike (for now, I’m sure that Zotero and other coverage is easily possible).

I’ve got no idea how he did this, given that Wave isn’t public yet…but the demo shows what’s going to be possible with Wave. Take a look, and get ready….Wave might change everything. You may need to click through and enlarge the player to really see what’s going on.

Igor – a Google Wave robot to manage your references from Stew Fnl on Vimeo.

Igor is a robot for Google Wave written in Java and running on Google App Engine.

It allows users to pull in references from PubMed & personal libraries on Connotea or CiteULike by querying services with keywords that they supply inline with the article you’re writing.

3 thoughts on “Google Wave and Igor

  1. Thanks for spotlighting that video. Makes me wonder why the traditional citation management software vendors (EndNote, RefWorks, et al) didn’t develop their own write-and-cite plugin for Word that offered this kind of “search your own collection and autoformat the cite” functionality. I can’t wait to get my hands on Google Wave to figure out how we can use it for reference services.

  2. The code for Igor has been posted at http://code.google.com/p/helpmeigor/

    There have been some interesting discussions going on over at http://groups.google.com/group/knowledge-waves, though things have been a bit quite in the past few days.

    I’d like to make two comments;

    Getting the kind of coverage for doing all of the citation wrangling, extraction and conversion that users need would best be accomplished though collaborative contributions to code, such as through extending Igor. I’m not sure that this is easy. If there is expertise within the library community it would be great to see code flowing.

    I’m excited to hear that there is an interest from within the library community about Wave. I work for Nature Publishing Group’s Web Publishing division, and the initial feedback that we have been getting from scientists is one of “Meh”. There is a long way to go before value from Wave can be demonstrated.

  3. The code for Igor has been posted at http://code.google.com/p/helpmeigor/There have been some interesting discussions going on over at http://groups.google.com/group/knowledge-waves, though things have been a bit quite in the past few days.I'd like to make two comments; Getting the kind of coverage for doing all of the citation wrangling, extraction and conversion that users need would best be accomplished though collaborative contributions to code, such as through extending Igor. I'm not sure that this is easy. If there is expertise within the library community it would be great to see code flowing. I'm excited to hear that there is an interest from within the library community about Wave. I work for Nature Publishing Group's Web Publishing division, and the initial feedback that we have been getting from scientists is one of “Meh”. There is a long way to go before value from Wave can be demonstrated.

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