I feel like I’ve been listing a ton of these Kickstarter style tech projects lately, but there are so many amazingly cool things being developed by individuals using the service that I can’t help it. Here’s a new project trying to get a head start on the Internet-of-things, with a small wireless sensor that can be programmed via the ‘net to do things when triggered. Very interesting technology, and like all tech, it’s only gonna get cheaper and more prevalent. 

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Twine : Listen to your world, talk to the Internet

The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Kindle is set to launch its own lending library this Thursday, without the support of any of the Big 6 Publishers (Hachette, Harper-Collins, McMillan, Penguin, Random House, and Simon & Schuster). Very, very interesting, but incredibly limited. It’s a foot in the door. Limiting it to just native Kindles is brilliant marketing. 
The new program, called Kindle Owners’ Lending Library, cannot be accessed via apps on other devices, which means it won’t work on Apple Inc.’s iPad or iPhone, even though people can read Kindle books on both devices. This restriction is intended to drive Kindle device sales, says Amazon. The program, which is effective Thursday, comes a few weeks before Amazon ships the Kindle Fire tablet on Nov. 15, which is a direct competitor with the iPad.

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Amazon Launching E-Book Lending Library – WSJ.com

Good: A really thorough examination of copyright and books. Bad: The _only_ mention of libraries is the DPLA project.  Ugly: The author perspective he gets is Ursula Le Guin, not exactly the most balanced of voices on this subject. Would love to have had a counterpoint to her POV in the the form of one of the usual suspects (Doctorow et al). 

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One Google Books To Rule Them All?